Tuesday, November 10, 2009

빼빼로 Day

Pepero Day is tomorrow. Pepero (or Pocky in Japan) are skinny little cookies dipped in chocolate, typically. Though there are also fatty jumbo Peperos, and Peperos dipped in strawberry, and Peperos covered with little bits of almonds. All are delicious. And since 11/11 looks EXACTLY like four jauntily tilted Peperos, well, it only makes sense to eat a ton of the stuff on November 11th every year.



Pepero Day was allegedly started by Lotte Co., Ltd, manufacturer of Pepero. You see, it's kind of like Valentine's Day: if you're dating someone, you buy them a buttload of Pepero. And if you're not dating someone, you buy a buttload of Pepero for yourself and your other single friends. And you eat three boxes alone, and then cry because you are lonley, and then go buy some more Pepero at Lotte Mart.


Maybe you decide that you need some retail therapy: WHO NEEDS A MAN, YOU CAN BUY YOURSELF 300 WON BOOTS AT LOTTE DEPARTMENT STORE


If you really planned an action packed day of single-gal self-pity, you could go to Lotte World in Seoul, a huge amusement park with all kinds of roller coasters and such


And then finally, you could round off the day with a nice squid burger/fries/green-tea ice cream combo at LOTTEria, the on-every-corner fast food chain restaurant of Korea


XOXO, capitalism! Korea ♥s you...

*I am 100% positive that I am eating Pepero tomorrow, buy the way. Cynical? Yes. Hypocritical? Double yes.

2 comments:

  1. omg LOTTE! this is an experience we can share. of course i enjoyed pocky in japan, though it's a glico product, not lotte... there are lotterias all over japan, though i never ate at one...and best of all, the baseball team of chiba, where i lived, was the chiba LOTTE marines! i wonder if japan is also celebrating pocky day?

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  2. Lotteria = a massive gut ache, so it's probably for the best that you missed out on that experience :)

    Koreans also have the Lotte Giants, a baseball team out of Busan...and from what I know, Lotte has tried to start something similar in Japan and it has failed. I guess Japanese people are less into buying stuff from massive conglomerates?

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